Name Dropping: 3 Companies You Didn’t Know Use AWS

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Amazon Web Services (AWS) is a cloud platform that’s provided by Amazon. In order to minimize the impact that emerges from outages, AWS is geographically diversified into regions that include several locations, Eastern and Western United States, Brazil, Ireland, Singapore, Japan, and Australia. With that diversity, the world essentially has your back!

We explore some organizations that you wouldn’t expect to be powered by AWS and its products to give you some examples of why you should consider taking the AWS plunge too!

McCormick & Company, Inc.

When it comes to technology, not many would think about this seasoning company. McCormick saw a need in the market to develop a tool that would understand each user’s tastes and palate, essentially mapping a user’s tongue. This need required some extensive tools, and AWS had the answer.

First, McCormick knew that AWS could handle the task, especially with the low cost and scalability of the Amazon CloudFront. What’s awesome about CloudFront is that it offers a management console for those who aren’t well-versed in code writing. CloudFront is a web-based, point-and-click graphical user interface to manage your migration to AWS, with minimal technical skills and knowledge.

Major League Baseball and Big Data

In the post-Moneyball era, we know how important data is for baseball. No one knows that more than MLB Advanced Media. They wanted to be able to access massive amounts of data during the season and not be bothered by it during the offseason.

That’s why they turned to AWS to develop a Player Tracking System.

There’s a collection of tools that allow AWS to hit it out of the park with each action-packed play that occurs in all 30 MLB ballparks. Batting first is AWS Direct Connect, which can provide you with an option that would reduce your bandwidth costs.

Because the tracking system relies upon a large amount of data, MLB Advanced Media needed to use something that would allow for a fast retrieval of data for analysis purposes. That’s why they use Amazon ElastiCache. ElastiCache is great because it’s open source and in-cloud, which cuts down the need for physical storage. Whether you’re powering something for the Web, apps, or even for gaming purposes, ElastiCache can provide the scalability and reliability.  

Duolingo

If you haven’t heard about Duolingo, it’s pretty cool. It’s a free language-learning service that now serves more than 120 million students.

Duolingo relies on Amazon DynamoDB to store 31 billion items that make up their lessons for more than 80 languages. Amazon DynamoDB is a fast and scalable NoSQL database that can provide consistency with any application.

For example, if your app is barely starting to grow and doesn’t need that much data, jumping over to AWS for DynamoDB provides the capacity, as you need it. Think about it this way: Duolingo is able to add to its catalog of language courses because of the flexibility of the database service.  

Bonus Organization: Did you know that NASA uses AWS, as well? NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) developed the Curiosity Mars rover with an application designed to send satellite images back to Earth. Where is this application hosted? You guessed it, on AWS.

NASA easily streamlined the strenuous process of sending satellite images from the Red Planet using the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) and Amazon Simple Queue Service (Amazon SQS) to deploy massive computations on Amazon EC2.

So, AWS provides the infrastructure you need to reinvent your organization or business. Due to the number of successful companies that rely on AWS services, AWS is perceived as a cloud-based platform that can and will transform your company.

Want to learn more about AWS? Browse our introductory training.